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xiv. females never having an in-between

I often mull over the phrase “no man can serve two masters”; it is an important proverb to keep in mind when one is committing actions that are diametrically opposed. For example, saying “I am a Christian and I believe in God and kindness” and in your next breath, slandering someone for their simple existence. You say you believe in God but your actions are the antithesis of kindness and love. But I also believe “to err is human and to forgive is divine.” We are fallible, we will always come short, and people should not expect us to be perfect.

I also mull over the dichotomy of human personalities; it’s titillating. I especially think about the multifaceted nature of being an educated black person in America. At one moment, we can discuss ratchet reality TV, then discuss drone strikes in Yemen, then quote Descartes, Ayn Rand, et cetera, then dance to Migos ‘Versace’, then code-switch and be ready for our professional jobs in the morning. I am absolutely positive that other races experience their own forms of dichotomy however I’m only familiar with my own experience and this post isn’t [solely] about being black in America…

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ferguson, michael brown, michael brown sr, Politics, racism, systemic racism

xiii. the unbearable whiteness of being

Darren Wilson was interviewed by the New Yorker and he reflected on the August 9, 2014, shooting of Michael Brown Jr. The profile gave a glimpse of Darren Wilson’s background; his mother was a thief and a crook, she wrote hot checks, stole money from everyone and anyone. Darren even had his own separate bank account to prevent his mother from usurping his funds. But in his eyes, she was a “good woman.” Michael Brown was 17 and he stole cigarillos; when riots erupted, Darren’s daughter asked “Why did you shoot him, was he a bad guy?” and he replied “yea, he was a bad guy.” But he admits that he never reflected on the type of individual Michael Brown was, he just knows that Michael was trying to kill him.

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Politics, Thoughts

iv. gradient

andre300

In 2011, documentarist Bill Dukes’ “Dark Girls” caused an uproar of repressed emotions and experiences. This documentary aimed to discuss the colorism issues within the black community; as a black woman, I enjoyed the concept of this documentary. The concept that “light is right” spans cultures, this is not native and characteristic of the American blacks. You see these thought processes in India, China, Japan, Jamaican, all over the Caribbean, Hispanic cultures. On January 19, 2015, he debuted “Light Girls”; his first movie, “Dark Girls”, discussed the ugliness that darker skinned women have experienced from their own race, images in the media, familial reinforcement, et cetera. “Light Girls” aim was to share the pain from the other side of the spectrum, show that fairer skinned women of color did face discrimination from their own people.

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